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>> talking to the taliban. >> thank you very much. appreciate it. >> members of the islamic group speak exclusively to nhk about their backroom negotiations with the u.s. aimed at ending the war in afghanistan. welcome to nhk world "newsline." on the front lines, u.s.-led forces are at war with the taliban. it's been like that for more than a decade. american leaders are still focused on winning, even as they're prepared to pull their combat troops out by the end of 2014. both sides have publicly refused to hold peace talks. but behind the scenes, they started negotiating in 2010. nhk world's hideki yui has been following this story, and he's the first to get interviews with members of the taliban's negotiating team. here's his exclusive story. >> reporter: u.s. and taliban negotiators have met at least five times over the past two years. most of the meetings took place in the doha. thank you very much. appreciate it. the taliban has a five-man negotiating team there. i was able to interview two of them. one of the negotiators was sayyed rasul, a religious leader who is said to ha
group taliban. it's been like that for more than a decade in afghanistan. both sides have publicly refused to hold peace talks. but behind the scenes, they started negotiating in 2010. nhk has been following this story. and our reporter has been the first to get interviews with members of the taliban's negotiating team. here's the exclusive story. >> reporter: u.s. and taliban negotiators have met at least five times over the past two years. most of the meetings took place in the capital of qatar. >> thank you very much. appreciate it. >> reporter: the taliban has a five-man negotiating team there. i was able to interview two of them. one of the negotiators was said rasul, a religious leader who is said to have a deep trust over the taliban spiritual leader. >> translator: peace and reconciliation has been our demand for a long time. and it still is even now. we want to have peace, prosperity, and the reconstruction of afghanistan. >> reporter: taliban negotiators said they and their u.s. counterparts agreed on two conditions for starting full-fledged peace talks. the first was the
by the taliban. we hear from those involved in the gun butt -- gun battle. and the british actor, damian lewis, picks up an emmy for his role in the "homeland." it is midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in the morning in washington, and 7:00 in the evening in china where they have been sentenced to 15 years in jail for their part to cover up the murder of a british businessman. the affair has seen the provincial governor suspended and his wife convicted of the murder. it might all be described in the but of local difficulty if it were not for the communist party trying to manage the transition to a new leadership. >> it is a hard fall from grace to one of china's most senior and high profile police chiefs. as he began his sentence, he was contrite. >> i would like to express my regret for the crimes i committed. i will spend the rest of my life repaying the party. >> a line has not yet been drawn under the scandal. there is still an undecided fate for this man. his former boss is one of china's most foul were full politicians. earlier this year his police chief sought refuge at the u.s. consulate and
the taliban. these missions will only happen with senior approval. a dramatic increase, killing foreign soldiers, it means the mission is keeping its partners at arm's length. >> obviously we take that seriously. to be honest, have we accelerated that in some cases? yes. have we stepped back? yes. we're not walking away. >> the british defense secretary denies this is a change in strategy. >> this is a draft we are looking at. we are looking at it now. >> international missions says it is not a draft. it will be effective from sunday. petitions forces seem to have been caught unaware. >> yesterday i asked about these deaths and he did not mention this at all. either he knew about it and was hiding or the americans are not bothering to tell their allies. >> the defense secretary was in front of parliament to clarify the policy in afghanistan. >> there has been no change of policy in afghanistan. as i told the house yesterday, the security of our forces in afghanistan remains a defense priority. the safety of our service personnel is an issue that all in government take extremely seriousl
strategy? we started by going to the heart of the taliban, the place where 9/11 was inspired. southern afghanistan, famous for its poppies, the taliban, and some of this war's toughest battles. lieutenant general james terry is the operational commander of the war. he agreed to take us into the notorious horn of pangway to see where we stand 11 years into this war. where we are right now, essentially this is the taliban homeland. >> we're headed right into it. >> we head over rich farm lands in kandahar province, making our way atop a strategically important hill top. >> this is looking back down over the district. >> it's a place where taliban fighters largely controlled until the u.s. troop surge of 2010. >> actually got in here and got into a pretty significant fight, a couple thousand taliban. the task force orion along task force 31. >> coalition officials say it is no longer a taliban safe haven. attacks are way down and roads are again passable. but as we witnessed firsthand, insurgents are still active. an explosion followed by a firefight erupted just below us. what's the bigg
the details. >>> the taliban says it is behind the bombing which occurred on saturday at the facility used by international security forces in the afghan capital, kabul. an attacker blew himself up as he neared the front gate of the facility. the bombing killed at least six civilians, including children, and wounded five others. the taliban has told nhk that the insurgent group began preparing for the assault months in advance. coalition forces said at a press conference on monday that the bomber was a 14-year-old boy and that they are investigating the incident. the suicide bombing follows an announcement on friday that the u.s. government is classifying the pakistan base, taliban-affiliated haqani network as a terrorist organization. the u.s. froze the group's assets in the united states in a move that is hardening the taliban. here's our report. >> reporter: the haqani network has repeatedly launched terrorist attacks in neighboring afghanistan. the u.s. accuses pakistan of supporting the group, but pakistan dismissed it, wh which has become a sticking point in bilateral relations. the
as american and nato forces face deadly new attacks. the first came friday when taliban fighters disguised in u.s. army uniforms struck a major base camp bastion near the capital of helmand province. the attackers killed two u.s. marines and destroyed six fighter jets plus refueling stations and aircraft hangars. the total dollar damage is estimated at $200 million. that was followed by a new series of attacks by men wearing afghan police or army uniforms, firing on coalition troops. on saturday a gunman and an afghan militia unit killed two british troops in helmand province. on sunday in zabul province an afghan police officer killed four american service members. and last night an afghan soldier shot at a vehicle at a camp, also in helmand, wounding a foreign civilian worker. there had already been a dozen such attacks by afghan forces on foreign troops in august alone, killing 15. and that was before the explosion of outrage over the anti-islamic film. on sunday, the top-ranking u.s. military officer, joint chiefs chairman general martin dempsey, called the insider attacks a very serio
u.s. control. >> america may be reluctant to hand over senior taliban commanders, they are the very key who may hold it -- group that may hold the key to lasting peace. >> kofi annan tell us why he took on the daunting role of the u.n. on void assyria. >> i did my best. >> keeping score in fenway park. carrying on a baseball tradition for 20 years. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the world. tomorrow marks the 11th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks which changed america and led to the invasion of afghanistan. more than a decade later, the notorious bagram prison which holds thousands of taliban prisoners and foreign suspects was handed over. the prisoners are still under american control. we report now from kabul. >> this was supposed to mark a moment of national pride and a marker on the road to afghans sovereignty. the official handover of bagram prison. while it hundreds have been transferred, hundreds more remain in the hands of u.s. military. >> we want to show the international community that human rights will be observed. i trust that they will do their job a
about that other attack by the taliban on a separate base in afghanistan. there, the attackers dressed in american uniformed killed two marines and set eight fighter jets ablaze. abc's mohamed lila has the latest. >> reporter: david, many american soldiers here are on edge tonight. four more u.s. troops killed by the very afghan policemen that they're working alongside. it comes after the taliban launched one of the biggest ever attacks against a coalition base. it's supposed to be one of the safest bases in the country. so fortified, no one could ever breach it. on friday night, the unthinkable happened. 15 taliban fighters wearing american uniforms blew a hole through the outer wall. storming inside with automatic rifles, suicide velss and grenade launchers. >> the taliban were able to execute this attack in a quite professional manner. they were able to pose as farmers and watching how the marines worked on base, where they worked. >> reporter: all coalition bases here in afghanistan has several lines of defense. the taliban were able to breach almost all of them and nearly hit thei
. >>> the taliban reportedly wants peace with the u.s. and afghanistan but at what price? what could it cost taxpayers? we'll talk about this stunning report that is coming up. do you ever have too much money? not possible. ♪ . ♪ ♪ i can do anything ♪ i can do anything today ♪ i cano anywhere ♪ i can go anywhere today ♪ la la lla la la la [ male announcer ] dow solutions help millions of people by helping to make gluten free bread that doesn't taste gluten free. together, the elements of science and the human element can solve anything solutionism. the new optimis to meet the needs of my growing business. but how am i going to fund it? and i have to find a way to manage my cash flow better. [ female announcer ] our wells fargo bankers are here to listen, offer guidance and provide you with options tailored to your business. we've loaned more money to small businesses than any other bank for ten years running. so come talk to us to see how we can help. wells fargo. together we'll go far. ♪ . melissa: so a new report from reuters suggests that chevy volts are running out of jui
? how much more money can they afford to throw out the window. we'll have details next. >>> the taliban reportedly wants peace with the u.s. and afghanistan but at what price? what could it cost taxpayers? we'll talk about this stunning report that is coming up. do you ever have too much money? not possible. ♪ . ♪ . melissa: so a new report from reuters suggests that chevy volts are running out of juice. the report suggests that chevy is losing $49,000 for every electric car it sells. foxnews.com automotive editor is here to crunch those numbers. gary, how in the world that's possible that they're losing that much on every car? run through the math and tell me if you agree with it. >> they haven't sold a lot yet and costs a lot to develop. they're saying $56,000 per car sold to date. $32,000 each to make and costs $39,000, that is how you get to a $49,000 deficit. this is based on estimate of $1.2 billion in development costs. it is per car. a year ago that was twice as much. a year from now it will be a lot less than $56,000 per car. is a snapshot of volt production. melissa: obvio
that the taliban raked in hundreds of millions of dollars last fiscal year. it also reveals a tangled web of funding sources with implications for the international community. nhk world's hideki yui reports. >> reporter: the war in afghanistan continues to take a heavy toll on the civilian population. more than 3,000 civilian deaths were recorded in 2011, the worst per-year figure since the conflict began. meanwhile, the taliban insurgency is amassing a large amount of funds. a report released by the u.n. tuesday said the group raised about $400 million during the fiscal year that ended in march. the report was based partly on the testimony of senior taliban officials currently under custody. the insurgency acquired about one quarter of the sum from opium farming and related businesses. that figure is smaller than generally thought. the insurgency group is diversifying its source of revenue to increase donations from support groups and unofficial taxes on local populations. part of group's financial success can be attributed to the anti-american sentiment that prevails in afghanistan. pub
.n. report says the taliban raked in hundreds of millions of dollars last fiscal year. it reveals a tangled web of funding sources. >> reporter: the war in afghanistan continues to take a heavy toll on the civilian population. more than 3,000 civilian deaths were recorded in 2011. the worst figure since the conflict began. the taliban insurgency is amassing a large amount of funds. a report released by the u.n. said the group raised about $400 million during the fiscal year that ended in march. the report was based on the testimony of senior taliban officials currently in custody. the insurgency acquired one-fourth of the some from opium farming. the insurgency group is diversing its source of revenue from support groups. part of the group financial success can be attributed to the anti-american sentiment in afghanistan. public anger is frequently found by incidents such as u.s. burning copies of the koran or shooting unarmed civilians. the u.n. report also points out the taliban is growing on increasing part of its income by skimming from the project. it said 107 to 20% of the group. last
of the main nato bases in the country, the taliban released a video that they shake -- say shows preparations for the assault on camp bastion. the bbc has sent this special report from camp bastion. >> the parade of u.s. marines, a replacement for aircraft destroyed by the taliban -- these handover can bastion -- these hang over camp bastion, the scene of a fierce battle. there was no moonlight. it was pitch black. they quickly moved to where the carriers were, firing rocket- propelled grenades. in a short space of time, it is triceps -- they destroyed several carrier -- harrier jets. the taliban video shows the insurgents in training. the attackers were wearing similar american army uniforms. their tactics have the hallmarks of the haqqani network. the pakistani-based group linked to the taliban. this is the aftermath of the attack, filmed again by the insurgents. flames and smoke hundreds of feet high could be seen for miles. british fire fighters crossed the runway. they described the scene as chaos. >> we saw a green tracer. we heard small arms fire from a distance. we realized that the s
was there. u.s. troops responded to an attack by the taliban gunmen >> reporter: the marine outpost was attacked moments ago, now those responsible are being searched for. dozens of men are in the marine compound. it is not a taliban gathering, but only a funeral for a local farmer. but as marines approach another group of mud farmhouses, they come under fire. >> right now, we're taking effective fire from the southeast. >> reporter: lieutenant mock spreads out his men, several marines dive into a rooftop. from here, they can see silhouettes of men hiding and shooting. >> he is popping out the right-hand side of the wall. >> yeah, that is where i spotted him. >> reporter: it is not clear if this is the same taliban that attacked the base. >> they think there are about 20 or 30 hiding, yards from here. some with rpgs, some with assault rifles, they called in air support, right now they're trying to flush them out, drive them into the open. >> what side of the compound? the navy corpmen and a few afghan soldiers advance closer to the taliban. but as soon as he goes in the house, an ex
the muslim world as we learn that a deadly taliban raid on a u.s. base caused extensive damage. but were americans the target or was it a certain base pilot prince harry? >>> downtown terror. new details about the teen's plot to plant a car bomb outside a busy chicago bar. >>> palace anger. a rare move by britain's family. going to court over those topless pictures of kate. >>> and playmates? a toddler tries playing with a gorilla. >>> good monday morning. i'm sunny hostin in for rob nelson. >> good to have you, sunny. >> and i'm paula faris. new anti-protests have erupted on the capital this morning. hundreds of people are throwing rocks and setting cars on fire. >> it's just the latest in a wave of demonstration against the anti-muslim film that mocks the prophet muhammad. >> reporter: americans are being evacuated from u.s. missions overseas as the furry continues in the muslim world. this morning, demonstrators took to the streets of kabul, afghanistan, still protesting over an anti-muslim film produced in the u.s. police fired rockets and cannons on protesters who broke through a ba
, is what our points intend. -- our opponents intend. that is what the taliban intend. and so it's very important for us to reaffirm what we are doing in afghanistan. that will not, our objectives will not be changed, and our work will not come to an end because of these attacks. we will defeat this threat as we have defeated so many threats to what we're doing in afghanistan. we've set out how we're going to proceed, that our troops will not be engaged in combat or in anything like the numbers they are now in afghanistan after the end of 2014, our commitments to the future including on how we will help to finance the afghan security forces and lead an officer training academy. we will persist in all of these things and defeat this threat as we've defeated others. >> well, i understand what you've said about president karzai, because president karzai's the person who will have responsibility after our drawdown in 2014. >> well, that will be a presidential election in 2014. >> well, we've seen presidential elections in the past in afghanistan. [laughter] >> well, perhaps -- [inaudible co
base in afghanistan that left two u.s. marines dead, several other troops wounded and the taliban now claiming responsibility for the assault on camp leatherneck. that is southern helmand province, to avenge an anti-muslim film produced in the united states. welcome to america's election headquarters. i'm gregg jarrett. >> heather: i'm header childers. u.s. na to have coalition say insurgents surged the embassy last night. how did the militants get past all that security to begin with. conner is live in kabul with the latest. >> reporter: this is one of more serious breaches we've seen in afghanistan. it's not clear how they got in the outer rim of security into the camp leatherneck area. they say at least 17 taliban fighters breached the outer perimeter of security. once they were inside they launched a massive attack on the camp. this is a camp where there are more than 10,000 u.s. marines and british troops including prince harry is also stationed there. the attack lasted for some period of time. it started after 10:00 p.m. last night. taliban hit the base with small arms, to grena
-- www.vitac.com >>> hello everyone, the taliban says they're responsible for the deaths of two united states manes, happening in helmand province. >>> and overnight, an assault at a joint u.s.-british base, where prince harry is stationed. the taliban has threatened to capture or kill prince harry. all of the taliban fighters except one were killed. >>> throughout the arab world, voices are still raised in anger against the united states. but the protests in libya, tunisia, and egypt are smaller in size and lower in volume. a mob started to form near the u.s. embassy in cairo today. but security forces broke it up. a u.s.-made film considered to be insulting the islam was among the protesters this week. >>> and pope benedict xvi calling for religious freedom in the middle east. crowds in lebanon cheered for the pope on the second day of his visit there. the pope praised lebanon as an example of how christians and muslims can work together, marriages between christians and muslims are not uncommon there. but the area has seen violence. there was a protest in tripoli and lebanon. scenes
's election headquarters, i'll kelly wright. >> jamie: i'm jamie colby. taliban is claiming responsibility for giving two u.s. marines at camp leatherneck in. and nearly 20 armed militants stormed the security perimeter using automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenades and explosives, forces killing nearly all the attackers, and saying they attacked the base bus prince harry is there, doing military duty at that base and to avenge an anti-islam film that insulted the prophet muhammad. let's get the facts on this. connor powell streaming live from afghanistan with the latest, connor? >> jamie, it's been a deadly 24 hours in helmand province. the growing line of insider attacks. and taliban had a blazon attack on camp leatherneck, home to rah means and prince harry is there as part of an apache helicopter unit deployed there and the taliban say they launched this attack in order to not only capture prince harry, but also, to, in response to the ongoing turmoil in the middle east and anti-islamic video. at no time during that attack, small arms, grenades and weapons of attacking that camp
assistance force in afghanistan. they helped to train the afghan army and police to fight the taliban on their own. there are mixed emotions as they learned of the shooting of a nato service member, allegedly and hands of an afghan trainee. it speaks to the difficulty of their mission. >> we have solid leadership. i am confident all the counter measures have been put in place and we will continue to do what is right for the soldiers performing the mission. >> i have four children. he is the first i did not get to see born. the sacrifice we do, it pays off. we come home. it is a good feeling. >> these men and women spent a year and afghanistan. they deployed on the 10th anniversary of 9/11 last year. for many of these folks, this was their third tour in afghanistan. this was the unit the physical education teacher was part of who was killed by an afghan gunman in february during the uprising the resulted from the burning of korans at the military base. >> thank you. another attack in southern afghanistan left two u.s. marines dead. a spokesman with the international security assistance
the afghan army and the police in the hopes they will fight crime and the taliban on their own some day. it is part of and in u.s. combat operations there by the end of 2014. >> the challenge was trying to train them to the way that we do it. we taught them the basics. our job is to show them how to do it and they learn how to do it. >> the homecoming comes on the same day that two nato troops were killed by an afghan police trainee. >> it is a part of the conflict that we deal with on a day-to- day basis. as a leader, i thought we were led and prepared and trained. nothing can help you prepare for something like that. >> they spent a year in afghanistan, deploying on september 11 last year, on the 10th anniversary of the attacks. for many of them, it was their third tour. >> i have four children, and he is the first i did not see born. the sacrifice that we do, it pays off, though. you come home, it is a good feeling. >> this is the same unit that included commander rogers, a longtime baltimore phiz said teacher killed by an afghan denman during an uprising that followed karan burnings
. the incidence after the taliban launched brazen attack on a coalition basement thought was the safest in the country. 15 taliban fighters wearing american uniforms blew a hole through the alter wall stormed in with automatic rifles, grenade launchers and suicide vests damage was enormous. >> this was a deliberate, well manned, well execute attack by the taliban that created chaos and mayhem on a base that should have been more secure and this should not have happened. >> reporter: taliban says it was targeting prince harry, a stationed at the joint u.s. and british base he was whisked way to safety moments after attack. the u.s. says the attack on libya was not planned. the interim president is suggesting the attack could have been the work of al-qaeda. tahman bradley, abc7 news. >>> now to mike nicco. [ talking over each other ] >>> good morning. here's a look at some of the cloud cover hanging around the bay area one of the reason why is we are going to be slightly cooler today than yesterday. because of stubborn clouds and marine layer hanging around. outside -- you can see cloud c
, with the war about to enter the 12th year, questions remain about the taliban resistance. but the man in charge of the war says the strategy for america getting out in the year 2014 is on track. it is quickly becoming put-up time for afghan forces and crunch time for the american commander overseeing the transition. >> reporter: what keeps you up at night on this job? >> the time, the amount of time remaining. >> reporter: time between now and 2014? >> that is correct, we have a lot of work to do. >> reporter: the u.s. and nato forces have trained more than 300,000 troops, taking the lead in combat operations. but threatening that, a deadly spike in insider attacks, afghan forces turning on their nato partners, 51 allied troops including 31 americans have been killed in such attacks so far this year. in a meeting today, the colonel acknowledged the existence of a training campaign. >> the taliban recognizes this is an opportunity for them to try to split us apart. we'll work very hard to stop that. >> reporter: the soldiers have to sleep with one eye open, doesn't that undermine the whole cohes
's a very effective strategy by the taliban to go right at the heart of the u.s. mission there which is to get the afghan security forces to stand up on their own, to take charge of security in that country so our men and women in uniform can come home. you know, u.s. military has sought to claim this is the result of a whole variety of causes, sometimes personal feuds or grievesances as well as taliban infiltration. that is true, but it's certainly a tactic that's being used more by the taliban as they see it having an effect, as they see it creating distance between u.s. troons and their afghan counterparts, as they see it, for instance, leading some of the nato members to accelerate their withdrawals from the country, particularly the french and the did you zealanders. so it's having the impact that the taliban commanders want it to have unfortunately. >> i don't buy the idea these are personal tiffs. it's not throwing a football at the guy that just tackled you. you don't commit suicide, and these are murder/suicides, aren't they, most was time, if you are just angry at the guy w
afghanistan, not by obvious taliban fighters or al qaeda but by infiltrators acting alone or in groups often wearing the uniform of nato's allies. here's cnn's anna coren in kabul. >> reporter: it's been a deadly weekend here in afghanistan, two more green-on-blue attacks, having afghan soldiers turning on the coalition forces training them. early sunday morning four american soldiers were killed after an afghan police officer turn his weapon on them. this follows an attack on two british soldiers who were killed on saturday. this is an alarming trend for coalition forces who have already lost 51 soldiers this year as a result of green-on-blue attacks compared to 35 last year. >>> in other tragic news, nato claimed responsibility for a deadly air strike that's killed eight afghan women, wounding seven others. anger broke out in the streets in response to this attack. it's believed these women were only picking up firewood at the time of the strike. they send deepest regrets and sympathy for the loss of innocent life. >> stay right there. in just a few minutes we'll go back to afghanistan whe
in afghanistan is expected to be minimal. i do not think, the taliban or anyone else would see that as a significant change. >> there has been very serious scrutiny of these attacks by the coalition forces. of course, israelis have to work out exactly what is going on, but the best study has shown that three-quarters of these attacks are not conducted by the taliban and that these people are not in any way connected to the taliban. why do you insist that these are connected to the taliban attack? >> they are the type that the taliban would like to see. some of them are organized by the taliban. others are by people who sympathize with the taliban. i think that shorthand is a fair enough description. >> as far as we can see, there are no links between these people and the taliban. is that not something that we should be taking on board and is that not something more serious? >> of course, it means that merely identifying the origins or background of the people involved is not sufficient. you have to have the forces with an increased ability to protect themselves. that is why one
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,141 (some duplicates have been removed)